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Prof. Dr. phil. Richard Latzel

  • Applied Sport Sciences
  • Periodisation
  • Monitoring
  • Performance Diagnostics
  • Metabolic Profiles of human movement and exercise
  • Strength and Conditioning

Professional Memberships

  • Deutsche Basketballärzte e.V.
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

Professor

Sport Scientist, S&C Coach, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (NSCA-CSCS)


Sortierung:
Zeitschriftenartikel

  • S. Kaufmann
  • O. Hoos
  • A. Beck
  • F. Fueller
  • Richard Latzel
  • R. Beneke

The Metabolic Relevance of Type of Locomotion in Anaerobic Testing: Bosco Continuous Jumping Test Versus Wingate Anaerobic Test of the Same Duration

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance pg. 1-7.

  • 22.04.2021 (2021)

DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2020-0669

Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic relevance of type of locomotion in anaerobic testing by analyzing and comparing the metabolic profile of the Bosco Continuous Jumping Test (CJ30) with the corresponding profile of the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Methods: A total of 11 well-trained, male team-sport athletes (age = 23.7 [2.2] y, height = 184.1 [2.8] cm, weight = 82.4 [6.4] kg) completed a CJ30 and WAnT each. During the WAnT, power data and revolutions per minute were recorded, and during the CJ30, jump height and jumping frequency were recorded. In addition, oxygen uptake and blood lactate concentration were assessed, and metabolic profiles were determined via the PCr-LA-O2 method. Results: In the CJ30, metabolic energy was lower (109.3 [18.0] vs 143.0 [13.1] kJ, P < .001, d = −2.302), while peak power (24.8 [4.4] vs 11.8 [0.5] W·kg−1, P < .001, d = 3.59) and mean power (20.8 [3.6] vs 9.1 [0.5] W·kg−1, P < .001, d = 4.14) were higher than in the WAnT. The metabolic profiles of the CJ30 (aerobic energy = 20.00% [4.7%], anaerobic alactic energy [WPCr] = 45.6% [4.5%], anaerobic lactic energy = 34.4% [5.2%]) and the WAnT (aerobic energy = 16.0% [3.0%], anaerobic alactic WPCr = 34.5% [5.0%], anaerobic lactic energy = 49.5% [3.3%]) are highly anaerobic. Absolute energy contribution for the CJ30 and WAnT was equal in WPCr (49.9 [11.1] vs 50.2 [11.2] kJ), but anaerobic lactic energy (37.7 [7.7] vs 69.9 [5.3] kJ) and aerobic energy (20.6 [5.7] vs 23.0 [4.0] kJ) were higher in the WAnT. Mechanical efficiency was substantially higher in the CJ30 (37.9% [4.5%] vs 15.6% [1.0%], P < .001, d = 6.86), while the fatigue index was lower (18.5% [3.8%] vs 23.2% [3.1%], P < .001, d = −1.38) than in the WAnT. Conclusions: Although the anaerobic share in both tests is similar and predominant, the CJ30 primarily taxes the WPCr system, while the WAnT more strongly relies on the glycolytic pathway. Thus, the 2 tests should not be used interchangeably, and the type of locomotion seems crucial when choosing an anaerobic test for a specific sport.
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Zeitschriftenartikel

  • S. Kaufmann
  • R. Beneke
  • Richard Latzel
  • H. Pfister
  • O. Hoos

Metabolic Profiles of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test and the Corresponding Continuous Version in Team-Sport Athletes-Elucidating the Role of Inter-Effort Recovery

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance pg. 1-6.

  • 12.04.2021 (2021)

DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2020-0761

To elucidate the role of inter-effort recovery in shuttle running by comparing the metabolic profiles of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) and the corresponding continuous version (30-15IFT-CONT). Methods: Sixteen state-level handball players (age = 23 [3] y, height = 185 [7] cm, weight = 85 [14] kg) completed the 30-15IFT and 30-15IFT-CONT, and speed at the last completed stage (in kilometers per hour) and time to exhaustion (in seconds) were assessed. Furthermore, oxygen uptake (in milliliters per kilogram per minute) and blood lactate were obtained preexercise, during exercise, and until 15 minutes postexercise. Metabolic energy (in kilojoules), metabolic power (in Watts per kilogram), and relative (in percentage) energy contribution of the aerobic (WAER, WAERint), anaerobic lactic (WBLC, WBLCint), and anaerobic alactic (WPCr, WPCrint) systems were calculated by PCr-La-O2 method for 30-15IFT-CONT and 30-15IFT. Results: No difference in peak oxygen uptake was found between 30-15IFT and 30-15IFT-CONT (60.6 [6.6] vs 60.5 [5.1] mL·kg−1·min−1, P = .165, d = 0.20), whereas speed at the last completed stage was higher in 30-15IFT (18.3 [1.4] vs 16.1 [1.0] km·h−1, P < .001, d = 1.17). Metabolic energy was also higher in 30-15IFT (1224.2 [269.6] vs 772.8 [63.1] kJ, P < .001, d = 5.60), and metabolic profiles differed substantially for aerobic (30-15IFT = 67.2 [5.2] vs 30-15IFT-CONT = 85.2% [2.5%], P < .001, d = −4.01), anaerobic lactic (30-15IFT = 4.4 [1.4] vs 30-15IFT-CONT = 6.2% [1.8%], P < .001, d = −1.04), and anaerobic alactic (30-15IFT = 28.4 [4.7] vs 30-15IFT-CONT = 8.6% [2.1%], P < .001, d = 5.43) components. Conclusions: Both 30-15IFT and 30-15IFT-CONT are mainly fueled by aerobic energy, but their metabolic profiles differ substantially in both aerobic and anaerobic alactic energy contribution. Due to the presence of inter-effort recovery, intermittent shuttle runs rely to a higher extent on anaerobic alactic energy and a fast, aerobic replenishment of PCr during the short breaks between shuttles.
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel

Trainingssteuerung im Spielsport: Basketball

In: Bundestrainerforum 2020 der Trainerakademie Köln.

  • 2020 (2020)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Zeitschriftenartikel

  • S. Kaufmann
  • O. Hoos
  • T. Kuehl
  • T. Tietz
  • D. R. Reim
  • K. Fehske
  • Richard Latzel
  • R. Beneke

Energetic Profiles of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Tests 1 and 2

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance pg. 1-6.

  • (2020)

DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0702

Purpose: To analyze the energetic profiles of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Tests 1 and 2 (YYIR1 and YYIR2). Methods: Intermittent running distance (IR1D and IR2D), time to exhaustion (IR1T and IR2T), and total recovery time between shuttles (IR1R and IR2R) were measured in 10 well-trained male athletes (age 24.4 [2.0] y, height 182 [1] cm, weight 75.8 [7.9] kg). Respiratory gases and blood lactate (BLC) were obtained preexercise, during exercise, and until 15 min postexercise. Metabolic energy, average metabolic power , and energy share (percentage of aerobic [WAER], anaerobic lactic [WBLC], and anaerobic alactic energy system [WPCr]) were calculated using the PCr-La-O2 method. Results: Peak oxygen consumption was possibly higher in YYIR2 (60.3 [5.1] mL·kg-1·min-1) than in YYIR1 (P = .116, 57.7 [4.5] mL·kg-1·min-1, d = -0.58). IR1D, IR1T, and IR1R were very likely higher than IR2D, IR2T, and IR2R, respectively (P < .001, 1876 [391] vs 672 [132] m, d = -2.83; P < .001, 916 [175] vs 304 [57] s, d = -3.03; and P < .001, 460 [100] vs 150 [40] s, d = -2.83). Metabolic energy was most likely lower in YYIR2 than in YYIR1 (P < .001, 493.5 [118.1] vs 984.8 [171.7] kJ, d = 3.24). Average metabolic power was most likely higher in YYIR2 than in YYIR1 (P < .001, 21.5 [1.7] vs 14.5 [2.2] W·kg-1, d = 3.54). When considering aerobic phosphocreatine restoration during breaks between shuttles, WAER (P = .693, 49% [10%] vs 48% [5%], d = -0.16) was similar, WPCr (P = .165, 47% [11%] vs 42% [6%], d = -0.54) possibly higher, and WBLC (P < .001, 4% [1%] vs 10% [3%], d = 1.95) almost certainly lower in YYIR1 than in YYIR2. Conclusions: WAER and WPCr are predominant in YYIR1 and YYIR2 with almost identical WAER. Higher IR1D and IR1T in YYIR1 result in higher metabolic energy but lower average metabolic power and slightly lower peak oxygen consumption. Higher IR1R allows for higher reliance on WPCr in YYIR1, while YYIR2 requires a higher fraction of WBLC.
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel

Kondition = Gesunderhaltung

In: Jahrestreffen 2020 der BasketDocs Deutsche Basketballärzte e.V.

  • 2020 (2020)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Zeitschriftenartikel

  • Richard Latzel

Energetic Profile of the Basketball Exercise Simulation Test in Junior Elite Players

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance (IJSPP) vol. 13 pg. 810-815.

  • (2018)

DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0174

Purpose: To analyze the energetic profile of the Basketball Exercise Simulation Test (BEST). Methods: Ten male elite junior basketball players (age 15.5 [0.6] y, height 180 [9] cm, and body mass 66.1 [11.2] kg) performed a modified BEST (20 circuits consisting of jumping, sprinting, jogging, shuffling, and short breaks) simulating professional basketball game play. Circuit time, sprint time, sprint decrement, oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate, and blood lactate concentration (blc) were obtained. Metabolic energy and metabolic power above rest (Wtot and Ptot), as well as energy share in terms of aerobic (Waer), glycolytic (Wblc), and high-energy phosphates (WPCr), were calculated from VO2 during exercise, net lactate production, and the fast component of postexercise VO2 kinetics, respectively. Results: Waer, Wblc, and WPCr reflect 89% (2%), 5% (1%), and 6% (1%) of total energy needed, respectively. Assuming an aerobic replenishment of PCr energy stores during short breaks, the adjusted energy share yielded Waer 66% (4%), Wblc 5% (1%), and WPCr 29% (1%). Waer and WPCr were negatively correlated (−0.72 and −0.59) with sprint time, which was not the case for Wblc. Conclusions: Consistent with general findings on energy system interaction during repeated high-intensity exercise bouts, the intermittent profile of the BEST relies primarily on aerobic energy combined with repetitive supplementation by anaerobic utilization of high-energy phosphates.
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • K. Fehske
  • Richard Latzel
  • D. R. Reim
  • O. Hoos

Bedeutung athletischer Fähigkeiten für die Spielleistung im deutschen Profi- und Nachwuchsleistungsbasketball . Ausgezeichnet mit dem 2. Platz bei der Wahl des besten Vortrags

In: 31. Jahreskongress der Gesellschaft für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin (GOTS)

München

  • 16.-18.06.2016 (2016)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel
  • S. Kaufmann
  • Stier S.
  • V. Fresz
  • D. Reim
  • R. Beneke
  • O. Hoos

Physiologische Beanspruchung deutscher Nachwuchsleistungsbasketballer beim Basketball Exercise Simulation Test (BEST)

In: 22. Sportwissenschaftlicher Hochschultag der Deutschen Vereinigung für Sportwissenschaft (dvs)

Universität Mainz Mainz

  • 02.10.2015 (2015)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel

Schüler- und Lehrergesundheit: Möglichkeiten zur Verbesserung der physischen und psychischen Gesundheit von Schülern und Lehrern durch Bewegung . Vortrag und Workshop

Egbert-Gymnasium Münsterschwarzach

  • 18.11.2015 (2015)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel
  • F. Megerle
  • D. Reim
  • K. Fehske
  • R. Beneke
  • O. Hoos

Bedeutung athletischer Fähigkeiten für die Spielleistung im deutschen Profi- und Nachwuchsleistungsbasketball

In: 10. Gemeinsames Symposium der dvs-Sektionen Biomechanik, Sportmotorik und Trainingswissenschaft

Giessen

  • 17.-19.09.2014 (2014)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • Richard Latzel
  • F. Megerle
  • D. Reim
  • K. Fehske
  • R. Beneke
  • O. Hoos

Bedeutung athletischer Fähigkeiten für die Spielleistung im deutschen Profi- und Nachwuchsleistungsbasketball

In: 10. Gemeinsames Symposium der dvs-Sektionen Biomechanik, Sportmotorik und Trainingswissenschaft

Giessen

  • 17.-19.09.2014 (2014)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND
Vortrag

  • O. Hoos
  • Richard Latzel
  • J. Rix
  • D. Reim
  • F. Megerle
  • R. Beneke

Unterschiede im athletischen Leistungsprofil von Bundesligaprofis und hochklassigen Nachwuchsbasketballern

In: 21. Sportwissenschaftlicher Hochschultag der Deutschen Vereinigung für Sportwissenschaft (dvs)

Konstanz

  • 25.-27.09.2013 (2013)
  • Angewandte Gesundheitswissenschaften
  • GESUND